Doom

created and published by id Software in 1993-12-10, running on MS-DOS
type: shooter
genre: Horror, Science Fiction, First-person shooter, Twitch shooter
series: Doom
perspective: 1st person
player options: single player, cable/nullmodem, Internet
game engine: id Tech 1
other: Shareware
languages: eng
4.4/5
GFXSFXControlsMusicStoryAtmos.AI

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Personal reviews (2)

Doom launched First-Person shooters as one of the dominant genres in PC gaming(although Wolfenstein 3D had established the genre), and also launched the PC as a viable gaming platform
Superb level design, well-designed weapons and truly frightening atmosphere. The pseudo-3D levels (Doom's engine didn't allow for levels to be multi-layered) were the best looking and immersive of the time and are still enjoyable today.
Also one of the PC's most copied games, its influence rings true in the vast array of First-person shooters. This has been both a blessing and a curse for gamers, as unimaginative and poorly executed Doom-clones swamped release schedules in the mid-to-late 90s.
Doom was originally released as shareware, allowing Doom to gather a massive following very quickly.
# 2006
My first digital addiction.. pure nostalgia.

Think back and feel the atmosphere again that was hanging around your DOS machine when it was playing those sinister midi files... what a game!
(Roland) - # 2003-05-04 20:01:55

Technical specs

display: raster, textured polygons (mixed)

Editor notes (3)

npc strife - they don't do this automatically, but will beat up their allies if subjected to friendly fire. This is a "feature" repeated in many games using the Doom engine.
possessed - the humans you encounter are controlled by demonic spirits or some such, not zombies or anything.
# 2009-01-14 06:50:35
DoomEd as well as the DOS version of DOOM were developed on a several platforms running NeXTSTEP 3.3. NeXTSTEP's design didn't really care if these systems were 68k, x86, or PPC:
Quoted from John Romero:
In fact, with the superpower of NeXTSTEP, one of the earliest incarnations of DoomEd had Carmack in his office, me in my office, DoomEd running on both our computers and both of us editing one map together at the same time. I could see John moving entities around on my screen as I drew new walls. Shared memory spaces and distributed objects. Pure magic.

(Zerothis) - # 2008-06-01 04:39:40
There was also an expansion to Doom called The Ultimate Doom that added fourth episode, "Thy Flesh Consumed", into the mix.
# 2007-04-29 17:09:24

Authors / Staff

management

Tom A. Hall (creative director)

design

Carl Sanford Joslyn Petersen 'Sandy Petersen' (design)
John Romero (design)
Shawn C. Green (design)

coding

David Taylor (programming)
John Carmack (programming)
John Romero (programming)
John Romero (tools programming)
Michael Abrash (programming)

graphics

Adrian Carmack (graphics)
Adrian Carmack (artwork)
Kevin Cloud (graphics)
Kevin Cloud (artwork)

level designer

John Romero (level design)
Sandy Petersen (level design)
Shawn C. Green (level design)

audio

Paul Radek (sound)
Paul Radek (audio drivers)
Robert Prince (music)
Robert Prince (sound effects)

thanks

Martin Kolodziej (special thanks)

External reviews (2) - average: 95.5%

review sourcecountryissuedatescore   
Génération 4 (1-82)fr621994-0195/10095%
Joystickfr461994-0296/10096%

Contributors (8)

AndreaD
teran01
zerothis
dandyboh
Sanguine
uvlbot-1
ermac
leszy

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Rate and review

7
LIKE
2
PLAYED
24
FINISHED
18
OWN
10
PLAYING
2
WANT
Doom in-game screen.
Doom ()
Doom (MS-DOS)
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