Groups

 

User Generated Content

Video game concept

Publishers/developers actively support & intend for end users to autonomously create 'mainstream' content for these game ever from the release moment.

139
games
14
platforms

Alternate names: Consumer Generated Media, CGM, User Created Content, UCC

The first video game about User Generated Content was released in 2002.

EA Games, Valve and Harebrained Schemes has published most of these games

Requires that the games support some form of modding.
Not as in 'skins' or themes, but complete content with original levels, characters, and plots. In short, a UGC game is intended to be used as the basis for many completely different and possibly better games.

Full requirements for this tag are:

  1. Intended, the day the the game was released, for UGC additions
  2. Development tools for creating original content.
  3. Training and training for creating original content.
  4. tools to collect the original content.
  5. services to collect the original content.
  6. tools to classify the original content.
  7. services to classify the original content.
  8. tools to distribute the original content.
  9. services to distribute the original content.
  10. tools to locate the original content.
  11. services to locate the original content.
  12. tools for creating original 'character' content (loose definition, a ball of mercury can be a character)
  13. services for creating original levels/environments (loose definition)
  14. the same tools and services provided were used by the developers to create at least some of the initial content (obviously developers have access to additional tools or could have more powerful versions of the provided tools.)
  15. Its possible to create better games than the developer's initially included content. (this still needs to be done if the provided tools are not as powerful)

An included system to train developers to use included development tools to develop original content that can be locating, collected, classified and distributed, may accomplish certain aspects of these requirements automatically for, or invisibly to, the end user. For instance, an shaped AI character can just up and leave one user's system and 'spontaneously' appear in another users system based on the character's compatibily with the other system via a network connection or removable media. Its actually more common to replicate to another system, rather than move . Thus a system for the first user's character, developed with tools that taught it to classify itself, distributes the character by announcing to the 2nd user's system, its location and class, that was compared to the second systems environment. When this AI encounters other AI personalities and/or slightly different environments, unexpected (better) things are bound to happen.