Groups

 

Available on Itch.io

Other (objects, etc.) entity

4860
games
16
platforms

The first video game about Available on Itch.io was released in 1983.

POLIMI Game Collective, Sudo Rossy and dos has published most of these games

On 2015-12-14, the optional Itch.io client became available.

There are several notable atypicalities of itch.io. Itch.io fee structure takes 10% of each sale for Itch.io (but this can be negotiated). At times, Itch.io has switched off their own fees or waved them. Other fees are owned to the payment services chosen by the developer (Pay Pal, Amazon, or Stripe; thus Itch.io has no way of switching these off). For example, a $10.00 sale nets $8.41 to the developer and $1.00 to Itch.io (or a $1.00 more to the dev when Itch.io isn't charging). Itch.io is pay-what-you-want by default. It also allows tiered pricing and individual pricing per file. Developers are free to blanket or individually price any any combination they can dream up of downloadable content, add-ons, extras, manuals, soundtracks, commentaries, art works, special editions, boxed editions, or what ever they can dream up to put in files to price. Limit of 10 files per game, 500mb per file (but these can be negotiated). Itch.io also allows for free games and donations. Itch.io has no licensing requirements so developers can choose any license they want (unlike, say, iTunes or any other Apple DD service). Itch.io does not impose its own DRM, "users download the games exactly as you uploaded them". As such, Devs are free to impose their own DRM, but all language on Itch.io is, except for the recently noted quote, written as if there there will be no DRM (Itch.io notes extensively they can individually negotiate certain aspects of their service. Thus the developer is wise to maintain a good relationship with Itch.io and customers). Itch.io currently imposes a 10 game limit per developer, but will negotiate if more are desired. Itch.io does not censor or restrict content in any way other than, duh, illegal content. However, Pay Pal, Amazon, or Stripe have their own policies for content. Amazon has 6 restrictions above an beyond maters of legality (including some that they do not restrict on amazon.com). Paypal's enforcement of content restriction not involving legalities is vague (as in, they might restrict what commonsense tells any dev they might restricted). Stripe may restrict content or cancel you "if you do something bad". Seriously, that's in their TOS.

Very notable for Itch.io is that, due to the product being a file (generic), there are absolutely no restrictions whatsoever to whatever platform the developer wants to sell for; "There are no restrictions". It could be for Amiga, an Atari 2600 game, or GNU/Hurd SPARC 32, whatever. Linux, Mac, and Windows are very common choices and Itch.io so far makes no special considerations (such as contests) for anything else.. Webpages are geared toward game nouns, game metaphors, game idioms, game similes, screenshots, and gaming culture. But, it does not have to be a game. Apps, books, music, data files, anything a dev can put in a file.

Also [b]unique[b] (it think), Itch.io will provide web design service for products of particular quality (negotiated).

Like some other DD services Itch.io provides a widget that's themeable. Should devs desire more customization, it can be negotiated. But this feature will be opened to all by default once the code can be secured against malicious hacks.

Itch.io uses OpenResty and is written in MoonScript and Lua using the Lapis framework. All files are store in the Google Cloud. The image server is magick running on top of ImageMagick. The list of things you've never heard goes on. And, I have my doubts that this is even a webpage at all. It's more like an alternate universe that appears as a webpage where it intersects our universe.